Theatre

About our Productions

Students from our Theatre and Stagecraft programs work on stage and behind the scenes under the guidance of professional directors and designers to produce two productions per semester, one in our Laura C. Muir Performing Arts Theatre and one in our Studio Theatre.  

     


    Fall 2020 Productions

    PLEASE NOTE: While the performances will be taking place on campus, due to COVID-19, and Douglas College's commitment to the safety and wellbeing of all students, staff and visitors, the performances will not be open for the general public to attend.  

    We cordially invite you, instead, to continue to support our programs and students by joining us for 4 Live Stream Performances, via Zoom!

    ZOOM Live Stream Links will be added soon, along with access instructions.

    Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
    Directed by Jane Heyman

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    PERFORMANCE DATES:

    November 12, 2020 1:00pm
    Opening Matinee LIVE ZOOM PERFORMANCE followed by a Talkback

    November 13, 2020 7:30pm
    LIVE ZOOM PERFORMANCE followed by a Talkback

    WARNINGS: Mature Content, Recommended for audience members aged 12 and up.

    View the Digital Programme

    LIVE STREAM LINKS:

    Nov 12, 2020 01:00 PM CLICK HERE  Passcode: 497358

    Nov 13, 2020 07:30 PM  CLICK HERE  Passcode: 954450

    Blue Window by Craig Lucas
    Directed by Deborah Neville

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    PERFORMANCE DATES:

    November 19, 2020 1:00pm
    Opening Matinee LIVE ZOOM PERFORMANCE followed by a Talkback

    November 20, 2020 7:30pm
    LIVE ZOOM PERFORMANCE followed by a Talkback

    WARNINGS: Mature Content, Coarse Language

    View the Digital Programme

    LIVE STREAM LINKS:

    Nov 19, 2020 01:00 PM CLICK HERE Passcode: 964666

    Nov 20, 2020 07:30 PM CLICK HERE Passcode: 833438

    Blue windows are everywhere in Craig Lucas' 1984 play — as scenery, as plot, and as metaphor. In this up close slice of urban life, we listen in to the living rooms of 7 individuals, the conversation is languid, layered, staccato — indeed, musical. Each of Lucas’ characters are so real they compel you to think about their existence beyond the play. But the wider view through the blue window  reveals a collision of seven individuals whose sharp angles and disparate fragments fit together to form a picture of our lives today.